Welcome to Mr. Hamill's
IHS History of the Americas On-line!

Check below for the most current assignments.

Final Exam: Monday, June 15th!

Be sure to come to class (room B-11)
at the start of 1st period to take the exam.

Note: I will post a "study guide" for you, and you will be able to use it (with notes) on the final exam.


Check your email

Hotmail

 

 



Email me

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

Google

 


  Use the pulldown menu to link to History of the Americas websites.

Click here for the Blackboard page

Click here for the Investigation / Historiography Page

Click here for the Levels of thinking (HOTS)

Click here to go to the web site for The American People (practice quizzes, study guides, glossaries, and more!)

Click here to make a "works cited" page online (OSLIS)

 


This will be the home page for the on-line History of the Americas class at Sheldon IHS for spring term, 2009. Be sure to bookmark this page.

Please note: this page will be updated frequently, and will include a description of class assignments, due dates, and class meeting times. Some assignments will be completed at the Blackboard site, and others will either be emailed directly to me, or turned in when you come to one of our class meetings in room B-11.


Final Exam: Monday, June 15th!

Be sure to come to class (room B-11) at the start of 1st period to take the exam.


Things to Review for the Final Exam (you can use notes, packets, etc.)

Who?

Emiliano Zapata

Porfirio Díaz

Los Científicos

Francisco Madero

Pancho Villa

Henry Lane Wilson

"Blackjack" Pershing

Carranza

Lázaro Cárdenas

Herbert Hoover

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt

Frances Perkins

Brain Trust

Hipólito Yrigoyen

Juan Perón y Eva Perón

José Martí

Fulgencio Batista

Fidel Castro

Ché Guevara

John F. Kennedy

Lyndon B. Johnson

Martin Luther King

Malcolm X

Supreme Court / Decisions

Bob Dylan

César Chávez

Betty Friedan

Where?

México, D.F.

Veracruz

Columbus, New Mexico

Celaya

Morelos

Buenos Aires

The Pampas

Detroit

Washington, D.C.

Birmingham

Havana

Sierra Maestra

Bay of Pigs

Alcatraz

Wounded Knee

Woodstock

Stonewall Inn

What?

Porfiriato

Haciendas

Agrarian reform

Plan de San Luis Potosí

Mexican Revolution

Plan de Ayala

James Creelman

Herbert Matthews

Tragic 10 Days

Coup d'etat

Constitution of 1917

Zimmerman Telegram

PEMEX

PRI

Laissez Faire

Stock Market

The Great Depression

New Deal

Fireside Chats

CCC, WPA

FDIC

AAA

Social Security

Hawley-Smoot Tariff

Good Neighbor Policy

Frigoríficos

Argentina's Economic Boom

The Peronato (Perón's presidency)

Eva Perón Foundation

USS Maine

Teller Amendment

Platt Amendment

Sugar Cane

CIA

Granma

"History will absolve me"

Cuban Revolution

El paredón

Cuban Missile Crisis

Zafra

USSR

Mariel Refugees

Cuban Exiles

Plessy v. Ferguson / Segregation

Brown v. Board of Education

March on Washington

Civil Rights Act (1964)

Voting Rights Act (1965)

Equal Rights Amendment

NOW

Chicano Mobilization

Bloody Christmas

"Termination" policy re: Native Americans

American Indian Movement

Students for a Democratic Society

The Weathermen

Bob Dylan

Woodstock

Stonewall Inn, NY

Silent Spring

Endangered Species Act


Civil Rights Homework #6: Class Discussion:

This assignment will need to be completed at the Blackboard site


Civil Rights: Homework #5 (Social and Cultural Protest) Read the rest of the chapter in The American People.

--Identify at least 10 "fascinating facts" from the reading.

--For each fact explain what it is and why you find it fascinating.

--you can do a few more for extra credit!


Civil Rights: Homework #4 (Latino Rights and Native American Protests) Read pp. 964-970 in The American People.

--Choose your own assignment (whatever works best to help you learn)!

Either:

--Make a detailed visual representation of at least 10 key things from the reading (you can either turn in a paper copy or send me a digital copy).

or...

--Write at least 10 original questions and answers over the main ideas from the entire reading, using a variety of levels of thinking (HOTS).

or...

--Identify at least 10 key terms from the entire reading. For each one, you need to define (explain what it is) and also analyze (explain why it is significant)


Civil Rights/Women's Rights: Homework #3 Read pp. 960-964 in The American People, and answer the following questions:

1. Who were the most significant leaders of the Women's Rights Movement? Why? What did they do?

2. What were the main issues that women were fighting for? To what degree were they successful?

3. What was the National Organization for Women? Why was it established?

4. Analyze the lyrics from the song I am Woman by Helen Reddy:

5. Explain the significant details regarding the Equal Rights Amendment (what? when? why? did it pass? etc.):

Bonus questions (extra credit): what were the similarities and differences between the Women's Rights movement and the movement for Civil Rights for African Americans?


Civil Rights: Homework #2 Read pp. 955-960 in The American People.

Choose your own assignment!

Either:

--Write at least 10 original questions and answers over the main ideas from the entire reading, using a variety of levels of thinking (HOTS).

or...

--Identify at least 10 key terms from the entire reading. For each one, you need to define (explain what it is) and also analyze (explain why it is significant)


Civil Rights: Homework #1 Read pp. 946-954.25 in The American People.

1. Identify AND explain the importance of the following terms:

Jackie Robinson--

Harry Truman--

Plessy v. Ferguson--

Brown v. Board of Education--

NAACP--

Little Rock, Arkansas--

Rosa Parks--

Woolworth's--

SCLC--

SNCC--

John F. Kennedy--

James Meredith--

Medgar Evans--

March on Washington --

"I have a Dream" speech (click here for the full text of the speech)--

2. What were the main tactics used to achieve further civil rights? What were the main obstacles during the civil rights movement? (for each, give specific examples)


The Cuban Revolution! Cuba Assignment #5

1) Read from pages 283 to the end of the Cuba packet.

2) Make a timeline of the 10 most important events in Cuba from 1961 - 1994.

Want extra credit? You can include illustrations for the five most important events (you can either turn in a paper copy or send me a digital copy).


The Cuban Revolution! Cuba Assignment #4

1) Read pages 276-283 in the Cuba packet.

2) Choose your own assignment!

Either:

--Make a detailed visual representation of at least 10 key things from the reading (you can either turn in a paper copy or send me a digital copy).

or...

--Write at least 10 original questions and answers over the main ideas from the entire reading, using a variety of levels of thinking (HOTS).

or...

--Identify at least 10 key terms from the entire reading. For each one, you need to define (explain what it is) and also analyze (explain why it is significant)


The Cuban Revolution! Cuba Assignment #3

Read the speech by Fidel Castro: History will Absolve Me (pp. 21-25)

--write a reaction to this speech, in the form of a letter that you are writing to Fidel Castro (at least 150 words). Be sure to include comments and references to specific things that he says in the speech, and also any questions you might ask him about the speech and what he has to say.


The Cuban Revolution! Cuba Assignment #2

1) Read pages 272-276 (top of the page) in the Cuba packet.

--write down 7 - 10 original questions and answers regarding the most significant events described in the reading. Be sure to include a variety of questions over the entire reading.


History of the Americas: Cuba Assignment #1

Read pages 262-272 (up to "a startling answer soon came forth") in the packet...be sure to read the "missing page" as well.

As you review the reading, please make note of the most significant facts for the categories listed below. For each one, you will need to:

a) write down the fact

b) explain the significance/importance

  • Cuban Independence

 

  • Cuba: Sugar and the Economy

 

  • Cuba and The United States

 

  • People (Cuban and American)

Random fact: The average Argentine citizen eats twice as much beef as someone in the United States.


Assignment #2: Argentina

***Please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu.

History of the Americas: The Peronato packet (mainly pages 197-219...you can skim over most of the first part of the readingt packet)

1. Define/explain the following terms:

  • Partido Único--
  • Descamisados--
  • Plaza de Mayo--
  • CGT--
  • La Prensa--
  • Jorge Luis Borges--
  • Eva Perón Foundation--
  • Peronist Women's Party--
  • IAPI--

2. Summarize Perón's actions regarding the press in Argentina, including his conflict with La Prensa . What happened in 1951?

3. What were the two changes (or "evolutions") that took place with Evita? (pages 214-215)

4. What was the most significant example of Perón's nationalization efforts in 1947?

5. Please list 4-7 facts about Eva Perón, her role during the Peronato, her relationship with Perón and with the workers (los descamisados), etc. For each fact, please indicate the page number.


At the start of the twentieth century, Argentina was one of the richest nations in Latin America. The nation enjoyed one of the highest growth rates (GNP) in the world, and their economic success was soon accompanied by democratic reforms. The formula was a simple one: Argentina possessed vast tracts of fertile land (known as the "pampas"), as well as a growing port city (Buenos Aires). The other two main ingredients for success came from abroad: foreign investment in Argentina's economic infrastructure (mainly from Great Britain), and a massive influx of immigrant workers (mainly from Spain and Italy). By the first decades of the 1900s, Argentina had a larger immigrant population than the United States.

The combination of rich land, abundant foreign capital, and a growing labor pool resulted in a thriving economy that was based primarily on the export of agricultural commodities such as beef, grain, and wool. The British built and operated the railroads, the loading docks, and the processing plants, thus establishing a sort of symbiotic partnership with the wealthy land owners (about 1% of the people owned over 70% of the arable land). Argentina sold its products (which were in great demand) at high prices to industrialized nations such as Great Britain and the United States, and in turn they imported manufactured goods. Although there was some "light industry" (meat processing plants, leather factories, grain mills, etc.) in Argentina at the turn of the century, it would not be until the 1930s that local industrialization would become a significant substitute for foreign imports.

The 1930s would also spell the end of Argentina's first experiment with democracy. With the Saenz-Peña laws of 1912 granting universal suffrage (note: for men only - women would not get the vote until 1947), the nation enjoyed relatively fair and free elections, a vast departure from the military dictatorships that dominated the 1800s. The Radical Party, led by Hipólito Yrigoyen, won the presidential elections three times in a row, in 1916, 1922, and 1928.

The party's major support came from the growing middle class, as well as the landed oligarchy. Yrigoyen did make some efforts to grant concessions to organized labor, but as protests and strikes began to increase, the Radical Party essentially abandoned the workers. The use of police and government troops to break strikes became more and more common, and reached its apex in 1919. In January of that year, Yrigoyen sent in troops to crush a general strike, and the result was a week-long attack that left hundreds of people killed and injured. The violence of the so-called semana trágica ("tragic week") was made all the worse by the accompanying campaign of persecution directed against immigrants (especially Russian Jews), who were labeled as anarchists and communists. Although the threat of a military takeover of the government probably dictated Yrigoyen's harsh stance towards the workers, this action deeply polarized the Argentine people, and the class conflicts that it reflected would resurface in the decades to follow.

With the onset of the Great Depression in 1929, the economic decline and the loss of support from both the middle class and the landed elite resulted in a huge setback for the Radical Party, as well as for Argentina's experiment with democracy. With increasing unrest and instability, the military staged a coup to overthrow President Yrigoyen on September 6, 1930.

Herbert Hoover was president when the Depression hit, and it damaged his political credibility a great deal. But can you imagine our military staging a coup to remove him from power?

We can make another interesting comparison between the USA and Argentina when we look at Franklin Roosevelt and his New Deal programs. In addition to his social welfare programs that resulted in huge popularity with the average American, FDR had an important ally in his wife Eleanor, who departed from the traditional role of first lady by taking an active role in government programs and policy issues.

In the next couple of weeks, we will look at a similar president and first lady in Argentina, only this time it was in the 1940s and early 1950s. Their names: Juan and Eva (Evita) Perón.


Assignment #1: Argentina

For this assignment, you will need to do a political and economic comparison between Argentina and the United States of America, looking at the early 1900s up through the 1930s. You can mainly focus on the Depression era, and what each country did to try to deal with the problem, although you should also include some things from the time before the Depression began.

The format of the comparison can be as if you were making a Venn Diagram. You can either make an actual Venn Diagram and turn it in to my box at Sheldon, or you can just make three lists (one for Argentina, one for the USA, and for what they had in common) and email that directly to me.

One example of a difference would be regarding trade policies. The USA maintained high protective tariffs (such as the Hawley-Smoot Tariff) while Argentina had lowered tariffs to trade with Great Britain (with the Roca-Runciman Treaty).

Resources for this assignment: In addition to the introduction to Argentina in the text above, you can also click here to read a summary/overview of Argentina during the early 1900s and during the Great Depression. It will also include summaries of what happened after the Depression, but you do not need to include that for this assignment...just up to the end of the Depression.


Unit Two: The Great Depression and the New Deal

Our next unit will examine the Great Depression. We will look at the causes that led up to the Depression, and we will also analyze the New Deal of president Franklin Delano Roosevelt. We will primarily use the textbook for this unit, and we will also use on-line resources. The link in the pulldown menu up above provides an excellent summary and overview of the main themes we will be studying.


***Test on the Depression and the New Deal***

***Please note: the unit test for the Great Depression and the New Deal will be on Monday, April 20th. You will need to come to class (Room B-11) at 8:56 a.m. to take the test. See you there!

***You can use notes and study guides on the test***

Click here for a study guide of things to review and take notes on.


Extra Credit: Political Cartoons of the New Deal (note: you will need to analyze at least one cartoon on the test on Monday...even if you do not do the extra credit, you should look at some of the cartoons, since they might appear on the test).

Click on the links below to see some cartoons related to FDR and to the New Deal. For each cartoon, explain the imagery (including any symbolism) and the main editorial message (what is the cartoonist trying to say?). Also, when do you think the cartoon was published? Why?

The New Big Stick

What a Man

Everybody's in the New Deal

Showing Mid-Season Form

Throwing Out the Umpire

These Sextuplets Aren't Doing Well


Assignment #8: Finish the chapter on The Great Depression in The American People, and answer the questions below:

***Please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu.

1. Why did FDR have a conflict with the Supreme Court? What did he try to do to solve the problem? Was he successful?

2. Why did the "fragile prosperity" of early 1937 collapse?

3. Explain the economic theories of John Maynard Keynes. To what extent did FDR's administration follow these theories? What was the result?

4. In your opinion, what were the four (4) most significant aspects of the "Third New Deal". List each one, and explain WHY it is significant.

5. Besides the negative aspects of the Depression, what were some of the other highlights of the 1930s ("the other side of the 1930s")? What do they reveal about this time period?

Optional Extra Credit: Make an original visual representation of "the other side of the 1930s". You can either turn this in to me on Monday, April 20th (the day of the unit test), or you can send it to me as an attachment.


The Great Depression / Assignment #7: Continue reading in The American People, pages 781 - 790

These are study questions -- you do not need to turn this in to me, but you do need to take detailed notes on the following topics/questions (you can use your notes on the unit test, which will be Monday, April 20th):

  • why did the New Deal move more toward social reform and social justice?
  • the Works Progress Administration (WPA)
  • the National Youth Administration (NYA)
  • Social Security Act of 1935 -- what was it? why was it one of the most important New Deal measures?
  • Who did the Resettlement Administration (RA) try to help? Was it successful?
  • How did the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) change the lives of farm families in the USA?
  • The Dust Bowl: Causes and Effects
  • Why/how did FDR upset the business community?
  • The changes that took place for organized labor. In what ways did things improve? In what ways did things worsen? (give several SPECIFIC examples)
  • What were the positive aspects and the negative aspects for minorities during the Great Depression and the New Deal?
  • Key facts related to "Women and the New Deal"


The Great Depression, Assignment #6: Online Quiz

Your first "online" quiz is ready on the Blackboard site, and you will need to complete it by Friday afternoon, April 10th. It is a multiple choice "open book" quiz over what you have studied so far regarding the start of the Great Depression and the New Deal.

When you log in to the Blackboard site, click on the "Assignments" folder on the left side of the page. Next, click on the link for The New Deal, and click OK when you are ready to begin.

Please note: Once you begin, you will have one hour to complete the quiz. Also, you can only take the quiz one time. When you are finished with the quiz, click on the submit button. I will then be able to see your score, and you can also check to see how you did. This quiz will be included in your mid-term grades, so again you need to be sure to complete it by Friday afternoon at the latest.


The Great Depression: Assignment #5: Read in The American People, pp. 774 - 781 (note: if you had my class for fall semester, then the page numbers should be correct for your text book....if you were not in my class, then you probably have a different edition of the book with different pages, so check in the index to make sure you are reading the correct section)

Write an original question and answer for at least 1/2 of the following terms : be sure to include a varitey of questions from the HOTS/Levels of Thinking page linked up above. You can do more for Extra Credit!

Also, be prepared for your first "online" quiz on this section, which will be early next week.

--Franklin Delano Roosevelt (F.D.R.) / his personal/professional characteristics

--Fireside chats

--the Brain Trust

--Eleanor Roosevelt

--The First 100 days

--First New Deal: Relief and Recovery

--Bank Holiday

--Emergency banking relief act

--Banking Act

--FDIC

--The Economy Act

--Beer-Wine Revenue Act

--21st Amendment

-- The gold standard

--FERA

--CWA

--PWA

--AAA

--NIRA

--CCC

--TVA

--F.D.R.'s main critics during the 1st New Deal, and their main concerns


Assignment #4: In addition to turning in your paper copy directly to me, you will also need to submit the Plan of Investigation, the Summary of Evidence, and the Evaluation of Sources to the turnitin.com website.

You can click here to sign up for your account and for information about how to enroll in the class and submit your paper.


Assignment #3 (Due on March 20th): The rest of the work for your Historiography investigation (summary of evidence, evaluation of sources, works cited page) needs to be completed. Please save your paper as a Word file (.doc) and email it to me as an attachment-- hamill@4j.lane.edu.

Remember to focus on the historical context of the question that you are investigating. Use multiple sources for the Summary of Evidence, and be sure to refer to the sample papers for examples of the proper format (note: you need to use MLA/parenthetical referencing, not footnotes).

For the Evaluation of Sources, be sure to evaluate only two of your best sources for Origin, Purpose, Value, and Limitations. Again, refer to the sample papers for examples of the proper format.

Your Works Cited page should only included sources that you have actually cited in your paper. Use the proper MLA style for the format, and be sure to alphabetize, double-space, and indent the second line (if more than one line). Your Junior Projects packet describes how to do this, and there is also a sample works cited page.


The Great Depression: Assignment #2 (due as soon as possible, before spring break)

Please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu.

Read in The American People pages 758 - 774 (note: if you had my class for fall semester, then the page numbers should be correct for your text book....if you were not in my class, then you probably have a different edition of the book with different pages, so check in the index to make sure you are reading the correct section)

1. What did the presidencies of Harding and Coolidge have in common?

2. How did Herbert Hoover respond to the Great Depression? Write one comlete sentence in your own words to summarize his response.

What did he do? (give as many examples as you can)

Was he successful? Why/why not?

3. Define and explain the following terms:

Fordney-McCumber Tariff:

Hawley-Smoot Tariff:

speculation:

margin buying:

Black Thursday:

Hooverville:

Reconstruction Finance Corporation:

Bonus Army fiasco:

4. What were the main causes of the Great Depression? Write a detailed paragraph to explain the main causes.


The Great Depression: Assignment #1 (please complete this activity before Tuesday, March 16th)

Go back to the "discussion forum" page at the Blackboard website, and complete the discussion for the 1920s forum. This is worth 10 points, so make sure you answer all of the questions, and also be sure to respond to some of the comments by the other students.


Unit One: The Mexican Revolution

Our first unit will examine the Mexican Revolution, which took place between 1910-1920. We will look at the causes that led up to the Revolution, and we will also analyze the results of the Revolution. We will not use the textbook for this unit, but we will use reading packets and on-line resources.


Homework #16: Work on history investigation (historiography).

Review for unit test on the Mexican Revolution (in class on March 12th, 8:10 a.m.). Click here for a review page, and also you can click here for a timeline of key events.


Assignment #15 (Due by Saturday, March 7th): Read pages 170 - 181 in the packet The Mexican Revolution: Part II

Note: You can also look at the last reading in the packet for supplemental information.

Please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu.

1. In what sense did Zapatismo still live on in Mexico after Zapata's death? Give several specific examples.

2. To what extent did Obregón and Calles implement Article 27 of the Mexican Constitution? Give specific details of what they did and did not do.

3. Write a thesis statement in your own words that succinctly answers the question:

To what extent did Lázaro Cárdenas implement the ideals of the Mexican Revolution?

In addition, give some specific details/examples that would support your thesis statement.

4. Define and explain the significance of the following acronyms:

--PEMEX

--PRI


Assignment #14: Creative Assignment (15 points) Due by Saturday, March 7th

Read pages 160-170 in the packet The Mexican Revolution: Part II

Write an original corrido about Emiliano Zapata. It needs to tell the story of his life, and include as many facts as possible from the reading. You may also include some details from the film Viva Zapata (this is optional). Click here for more details about the origin and structure of the corrido.

Please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu.

Specifications:

16 - 32 verses (lines) in length

8 - 10 syllables each verse (note: extra credit if all verses have 8 syllables!)

rhyme scheme (AA, BB, CC, DD, or ABAB, CDCD, etc.)

introduction/formal opening

state the time and place (context)

tell the story of Emiliano Zapata (his life, key events, people, places, etc.)

message or moral of the story (optional)

farewell (despedida) / end of the corrido

word-processed / spell checked

To earn full credit, be sure to do your own work!


Assignment #13: Work on the "Summary of Evidence" for your Historiography investigation. You should focus on the historical context of the question that you are investigating. Use multiple sources for each section of the summary of evidence, and be sure to refer to the sample papers for examples of the proper format (note: you need to use MLA/parenthetical referencing, not footnotes).
Assignment #12: Read the Mexican Constitution (click here to read the parts that you need for this assignment), and then answer the following questions. Note: you can also click here to download the worksheet/questions as a word file.

The Mexican Constitution of 1917

1. What does the Constitution say about slavery? Where?

2. What does Article 3 say about equality?

3. According to Article 3, what are 5 things that education will be?

4. How was the Church affected by Article 3?

5. Giving specific referenced/examples, explain how you would be affected by Article 27 if you were:

A landless peasant:

British Petroleum company:

William Randolph Hearst (an American citizen):

The Catholic Church:

6. What are "ejidos"? Why are they important in Article 27?

7. Who is affected by Article 123?

8. Read the first 15 parts of section A (Article 123). List five of these provisions that are most beneficial to workers in your opinion.

9. Summarize what Article 123 says about strikes in Mexico.

10. In your opinion, who benefits most from Article 123 , workers or business owners? Give a few examples to support your opinion.

11. What does Article 123 say about social security? Where (which section)?

12. What does Article 123 say about: Length of work day__________________Minimum wage___________________ work week_________________vacations___________________

13. How are women affected by Article 123? Give as many examples as you can find.

14. Which of the three Articles is most "revolutionary" in your opinion? Explain why.


Assignment #11: Read pages 153 - 160 in the packet The Mexican Revolution: Part II

1. Imagine you a newspaper reporter assigned to cover the Mexican Revolution. Your job is to write an article (at least one complete paragraph), to explain what happened when Villa and Zapata met in Mexico City (include descriptions, dates, details, etc.)

2. a) Describe what happened at the Battle of Celaya (who? what? when? where? why?)

b) What happened as a result of this battle?

3. What are the main elements of the Mexican Constitution of 1917?

4. List three (3) significant things you learned about Carranza and his presidency:


Assignment #10: The Plan of Investigation for your Historiography assignment is due on Friday, Feb. 20th. You can pick up a yellow packet on the front table in room B-11 to see sample papers with the proper format.
Assignment #9: Read pages 139 - 152 in the packet on Mexico (the specific reading is The Mexican Revolution: Part II )
and answer the following questions (please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu):

1. Why does the author state that Mexico's prosperity was "false"?

2. Who were the Flores-Magón brothers? What did they do?

3. List three significant things you learned about Francisco Madero.

 

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--

 

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4. Which book did Madero publish in 1908? What was the book's main thesis?

5. Summarize the celebration that happened in September, 1910 (give details).

6. Where did the most important early battles take place? Who was the main leader?

7. Who was Pancho Villa? What are "corridos" (see the page with Villa's photograph)

8. Who were the soldaderas? What role did they have in the Revolution?

9. In May of 1911, things seemed pretty optimistic in Mexico. Why? What happened?

10. Why did Zapata declare himself in revolt against Madero?

11. In what way was Madero "caught in the middle", with opponents on both sides in Mexico?

12. Explain the Tragic Ten Days (when? where? what? etc.). What happened to Madero immediately after the Tragic Ten Days?

13. List five (5) significant events that took place in Mexico during the the Huerta presidency.

 

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--

 

--

 

--

 

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14. Write a thesis statement in your own words that succinctly answers the question:

Why was there a growing anti-American sentiment in Mexico?

In addition, give as many details/examples as you can of U.S. involvement in Mexico during the Revolution.


Assignment #8: Read the revolutionary plans that were written by Franciscio Madero and Emiliano Zapata (click here) and answer the following questions (please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu):

1. According to Madero, why is a revolution necessary? How does Madero describe Porfirio Díaz?

(more details=more points)

2. What are the main details of the plan? What does Madero call for? (write a list of as many as possible)

3. What does Madero want to have happen on November 20, 1910?

4. According to the Plan de Ayala, why does Zapata not recognize Madero's government?

5. How does Zapata describe Madero?

6. What does the Plan de Ayala say about the distribution of land, water, etc.? Give details.

In your opinion, is this aspect of the plan just? Why/why not?


Assignment #7: Read the Creelman Interview, and then analyze it for its origin, purpose, value, and limitations. You can email your analysis of this important document directly to me.
Assignment #6: The plan for your historiography investigation is not due until Friday, Feb. 20th. But before you proceed with your research, please email me (
hamill@4j.lane.edu) two-three possible topics that you are considering. You should email this to me no later than Tuesday, Feb. 10th, and then I will write you back and give you some feedback regarding your ideas.
Activity #5: There are
two options for this next assignment:

For either option, you will need to demonstrate that you have read and reviewed both of the readings in the new packet about the Porfiriato (the presidency of Porfirio Díaz). As you can see, the first reading is very detailed. The next reading (with all of the pictures) is not quite as detailed, but it does provide a good overview of this time period. One reason we are using several different sources is to allow you to see what you will be doing for your Historiography investigation (utilizing a variety of sources about one topic).

Option A: make a detailed visual representation of the Porfiriato. This can be a collage, drawings, computer clip art, photos, etc. You can either turn your finished work in directly to me at Sheldon, or you can scan an image of it, or take a digital photograph, and then send that to me as an attachment. You need to illustrate 10 - 15 different aspects of the Porfiriato, and you will need to include examples from both of the readings. Please be sure to indicate where (which page) you found the information that you have included in your visual representation.

Option B: As an alternative to the visual representation, you may choose to identify (in writing) 10 - 15 different aspects of the Porfiriato. You will need to include examples from both of the readings, and you will need to define each item (describe what it is) and also analyze its significance (explain why it is important). Please be sure to indicate where (which page) you found the information that you have included. If you select this option, you can email your work directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu. Again, please use the main email account that you will use for this class.


Activity #4: The following questions are from the first reading in your packet. Please email your answers directly to me at hamill@4j.lane.edu. Also, please use the main email account that you will use for this class.

Thanks!

Note: when you finish this short assignment, continue reading the next parts of the packet. It is all about the presidency of Porfirio Díaz, and your next assignment will be over these readings (and will be posted shortly).

1. How does the history of México represent a study of contrasts?

2. Describe México after the wars of independence (two adjectives):

3. What are the examples of economic problems that Mexico had to face after independence (list as many as you can find)?

4. Which two institutions held power in Mexico after independence?

5. What word would describe the political situation in Mexico between 1821-1860? Why?

6. What did the US Congress do in 1845? What happened as a result?

7. Bonus Question: Which treaty ended the war between the U.S. and Mexico? In which year?


Activity #3: For those of you that posted your comments and responses to other students for Activity #2, good job! If you have not yet done so, skip down to the descriptioin of Activity #2 and complete it right now.

Regarding these scenarios about land owenership and the political situation, it may seem hard to imagine, but the people of Mexico lived under these very circumstances during the dictatorship of Don Porfirio Díaz (1876-1911), a period that was known as the "Porfiriato".

All of the best land in Mexico was concentrated in the large haciendas, and 800 elite families owned 90% of the land.

The slogan of Don Porfirio was orden y progreso (order and progress), but lamentably the "order" existed under a system of repression and social injustice, and the "progress" was almost exclusively for the rich to enjoy. With the lack of a true democracy, the inequality in terms of the division of wealth and land, and the repression of both agricultural and industrial workers, the Porfiriato was a direct precursor to the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920).

The first part of the new reading packet describes the events leading up to the Porfiriato, and then provides a detailed description of his presidency. For your next assignment, start reading the first two readings in the packet, and as you proceed, you should highlight/underline the key points. I will post questions for you to answer shortly.


Activity #2 (please complete this activity on Wednesday, Feb. 4th)

Go back to the "discussion forum" page at the Blackboard website, and complete the discussion for the Imagine! forum. This is worth 10 points, so make sure you answer all of the questions, and also be sure to respond to some of the comments by the other students.


Day One: The first activity to start the new semester will be to go to the Blackboard website. You have been given a student account and password to access this site. The password is temporary, so you will want to change it to a new password sometime in the near future.

Once you are at the website and have logged in, you will see a "welcome" page. On the right side of the page is a box showing "courses in which you are enrolled"...please click on the link for IHS History of the Americas. This will now take you to an "announcements" page, and the two announcements posted on Feb. 2nd are specifically for you. The first announcement explains how to change your password. The second announcement explains how to use the "discussion forum". Please follow the directions in the announcement, and then complete the first discussion assignment (your introduction to the rest of the class).


Homework: start reading the new packet on the Mexican Revolution.


 

   

 

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